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  2. Track the storm here | In the storm's path? Bookmark CNN's lite site View the full article
  3. Jordan Pruitt, a former Disney star and contestant on “The Voice” has filed a lawsuit alleging her former manager, Keith Thomas, of sexually abusing her when she was just 14 years old. View the full article
  4. The Adrian Darya 1, the Iranian oil tanker that the U.S. has pursued for several days, is now fewer than 10 nautical miles from the shores of Syria, intelligence sources tell Fox News. View the full article
  5. An Afghan man suspected in a knife attack that killed a 19-year-old and injured eight other people at a metro station in France on Saturday was on drugs and in a “psychotic state,” according to a prosecutor. View the full article
  6. It appears that Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., will meet with actress/activist Alyssa Milano to discuss gun violence after the two of them feuded on Twitter following the last weekend's deadly mass shooting in Odessa, Texas. View the full article
  7. Jesse Watters called the phone number actress Debra Messing tweeted after she asked for a list of those attending a Beverly Hills, Calif. fundraiser for President Trump. View the full article
  8. Vice President Mike Pence is in Ireland right now, staying at the Doonbeg resort owned by his boss, President Donald Trump. View the full article
  9. As Iran continues to up the ante on its nuclear program, reportedly stockpiling low-enriched uranium beyond the limitations outlined in the 2015 nuclear deal, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said his country always will say "no" to bilateral talks with the United States. View the full article
  10. Former Defense Secretary James Mattis, in stark terms, lambasts Barack Obama and Joe Biden's leadership in his new book, and suggests their naivete and ignorance of "reality" contributed to the rise of ISIS in Iraq, according to excerpts reviewed by The Washington Examiner. View the full article
  11. A state court in North Carolina unanimously struck down Republican-led efforts to maintain state legislative districts on Tuesday, holding that they amount to unconstitutional partisan gerrymanders that violate the state's Constitution. View the full article
  12. • READ: Letter announcing decision to divert funds for the wall View the full article
  13. More than half of America's state attorneys general are set to announce a new probe into Google over possible antitrust violations in a huge escalation against Big Tech. View the full article
  14. • What we know about the boat and its last excursion View the full article
  15. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has signed off on spending $3.6 billion in Defense Department construction funds for 175 miles of wall on the southern border with Mexico, Pentagon officials told Fox News on Tuesday. View the full article
  16. "The View" host Meghan McCain received a wave of backlash on Tuesday after she attempted to defend gun rights to her co-hosts. View the full article
  17. Hurricane Dorian survivor, Howard Armstrong, recalls the heartbreaking moment water filled up his home. He escaped with only the clothes on his back. View the full article
  18. Aerial footage over Great Abaco Island, Bahamas, shows the effect of Hurricane Dorian's wrath. View the full article
  19. A striking satellite image of Grand Bahama Island shows vast areas of the island under water after Hurricane Dorian passed through the region on Monday. View the full article
  20. CNN's Ivan Cabrera says Hurricane Dorian is still a threat to Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina even though it has been downgraded to a Category 3 storm. View the full article
  21. The term "flame-wars" was coined way back in the 1970s when computer scientists talking in the first electronic discussion boards noticed that here was "an escalation of critical comments and an increase in the frequency with which people would respond with short negative messages." For anyone that has ventured into the comment section of Youtube, read Twitter for more than a few minutes or frequented active forums will know that our behaviour hasn't improved. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D., a psychologist and professor at MIT, conducted hundreds of interviews over 15 years and found that "we allow ourselves behaviours online we never would in person." These interactions aren't just restricted to strangers on social media as Turkle notes that "we do things online that hurt and damage real relationships". Why is this? Tom Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar project on civic engagement at the Harvard Kennedy School, explains that having the ability to be anonymous "can be a real attraction if no one knows you have a drinking problem or depression. The Internet can be useful in allowing people to anonymously 'come out' about their problems and get support. But it is also an Achilles heel. If people don't know who you are, you are much more likely to say things in a nasty or snarky tone. In general, we invest less in our reputation in online groups because it is easier to exit them and join other groups. In real space, if you don't get along with your neighbour, you're less likely to say something really nasty, because moving out of town is costly." A lot of toxicity is from those who just like hearing themselves talk, or feel better when they put others down. Some people think they are clever and witty by using sarcasm and pointing out the flaws in another's argument. Here's a few ways to manage negativity in your community. Model your ideal behaviour The simplest and most effective way to manage negativity in your community is to be the behaviour you seek. Ensure your replies and friendly and polite. Be fun where appropriate and learn about your regular members. Make sure your team is visible and post regularly so the community feels well run and someone is on hand to deal with issues when they arise. Your community will follow suit and replicate your behaviour. When your community is positive and helpful, toxicity and negativity find it very hard to get a foothold. Your members will weed it out and correct those members for you. Have clear guidelines Socious's Senior Director of Community Management, Katie Bapple advises moderators not to be impulsive when dealing with toxic members. "Controversial community members should not be dealt with compulsively; have reasonable guidelines and policies in place that draw a clear line, so you know when it's been crossed." A clear and well-written community guidelines document won't stop trouble from occurring, but it will provide your team with clear boundaries and protocols to follow. Have a light touch with moderation tools It's easy to reach for the moderation tools when you see toxic or very harmful posts in a topic. It only takes a few clicks, and you can remove it from view and pretend it didn't happen. However, much like a child trying to get his parent's attention, the more you try and silence them, the louder and more insistent they will be to get heard. They'll very likely return more inflamed and vitriolic than before. Unless the content crosses the boundaries you have set for your community; it is often more productive to post a polite reply gently guiding the discussion back on track and thank contributors for their input so far. If this doesn't de-escalate the situation, then: Make it private Open a dialogue with the offender to try and calm the situation. Often this act alone makes the member feel valued and transforms them into a happy and productive member of the community. Just remind them of the boundaries set out in your community guidelines. At least you will stop the member from continuing to post in public areas and derailing topics. Use the appropriate moderation tool Invision Community is packed with tools to help manage toxicity and negativity. However, reaching right for the ban button may not be the best course of action. Consider a warning, which the member must acknowledge before posting again. Keep it friendly and polite and to the point. If the behaviour continues, then consider a short term block. Often an enforced 48 hours away from the community is enough to regain some perspective. Don't assume it'll go away The truth is people love drama, and most people are drawn towards negativity. We can't help but look when we come across a vehicle accident, and sadly, it's largely the same in a community. It might be tempting to keep on scrolling and hope that it all sorts itself out. Likely, it won't, and intervention will be required. That might be a polite, friendly reminder to get the topic back on track, or contacting the member in private. Either way, the best approach is to nip it in the bud with a light touch before it spins out of control, and more forceful action is required. You can't please everyone It should be a last resort, but your community may not be a good fit for everyone. If that is the case, then you can consider a permanent ban, or demoting the member into a read-only member group. Ultimately though negativity and toxicity are pretty rare in an upbeat and productive community. Most quarrels are fixed quickly, and it's rare to find a troll determined to corrupt your community. Identify your boundaries and educate your community on what is not acceptable and be proactive when issues arise, and you'll keep sentiment positive. If you run your own community, I'd love to know what tips you can share on dealing with negativity and toxicity. Let me know below. View the full article
  22. The term "flame-wars" was coined way back in the 1970s when computer scientists talking in the first electronic discussion boards noticed that here was "an escalation of critical comments and an increase in the frequency with which people would respond with short negative messages." For anyone that has ventured into the comment section of Youtube, read Twitter for more than a few minutes or frequented active forums will know that our behaviour hasn't improved. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D., a psychologist and professor at MIT, conducted hundreds of interviews over 15 years and found that "we allow ourselves behaviours online we never would in person." These interactions aren't just restricted to strangers on social media as Turkle notes that "we do things online that hurt and damage real relationships". Why is this? Tom Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar project on civic engagement at the Harvard Kennedy School, explains that having the ability to be anonymous "can be a real attraction if no one knows you have a drinking problem or depression. The Internet can be useful in allowing people to anonymously 'come out' about their problems and get support. But it is also an Achilles heel. If people don't know who you are, you are much more likely to say things in a nasty or snarky tone. In general, we invest less in our reputation in online groups because it is easier to exit them and join other groups. In real space, if you don't get along with your neighbour, you're less likely to say something really nasty, because moving out of town is costly." A lot of toxicity is from those who just like hearing themselves talk, or feel better when they put others down. Some people think they are clever and witty by using sarcasm and pointing out the flaws in another's argument. Here's a few ways to manage negativity in your community. Model your ideal behaviour The simplest and most effective way to manage negativity in your community is to be the behaviour you seek. Ensure your replies and friendly and polite. Be fun where appropriate and learn about your regular members. Make sure your team is visible and post regularly so the community feels well run and someone is on hand to deal with issues when they arise. Your community will follow suit and replicate your behaviour. When your community is positive and helpful, toxicity and negativity find it very hard to get a foothold. Your members will weed it out and correct those members for you. Have clear guidelines Socious's Senior Director of Community Management, Katie Bapple advises moderators not to be impulsive when dealing with toxic members. "Controversial community members should not be dealt with compulsively; have reasonable guidelines and policies in place that draw a clear line, so you know when it's been crossed." A clear and well-written community guidelines document won't stop trouble from occurring, but it will provide your team with clear boundaries and protocols to follow. Have a light touch with moderation tools It's easy to reach for the moderation tools when you see toxic or very harmful posts in a topic. It only takes a few clicks, and you can remove it from view and pretend it didn't happen. However, much like a child trying to get his parent's attention, the more you try and silence them, the louder and more insistent they will be to get heard. They'll very likely return more inflamed and vitriolic than before. Unless the content crosses the boundaries you have set for your community; it is often more productive to post a polite reply gently guiding the discussion back on track and thank contributors for their input so far. If this doesn't de-escalate the situation, then: Make it private Open a dialogue with the offender to try and calm the situation. Often this act alone makes the member feel valued and transforms them into a happy and productive member of the community. Just remind them of the boundaries set out in your community guidelines. At least you will stop the member from continuing to post in public areas and derailing topics. Use the appropriate moderation tool Invision Community is packed with tools to help manage toxicity and negativity. However, reaching right for the ban button may not be the best course of action. Consider a warning, which the member must acknowledge before posting again. Keep it friendly and polite and to the point. If the behaviour continues, then consider a short term block. Often an enforced 48 hours away from the community is enough to regain some perspective. Don't assume it'll go away The truth is people love drama, and most people are drawn towards negativity. We can't help but look when we come across a vehicle accident, and sadly, it's largely the same in a community. It might be tempting to keep on scrolling and hope that it all sorts itself out. Likely, it won't, and intervention will be required. That might be a polite, friendly reminder to get the topic back on track, or contacting the member in private. Either way, the best approach is to nip it in the bud with a light touch before it spins out of control, and more forceful action is required. You can't please everyone It should be a last resort, but your community may not be a good fit for everyone. If that is the case, then you can consider a permanent ban, or demoting the member into a read-only member group. Ultimately though negativity and toxicity are pretty rare in an upbeat and productive community. Most quarrels are fixed quickly, and it's rare to find a troll determined to corrupt your community. Identify your boundaries and educate your community on what is not acceptable and be proactive when issues arise, and you'll keep sentiment positive. If you run your own community, I'd love to know what tips you can share on dealing with negativity and toxicity. Let me know below. View the full article
  23. The term "flame-wars" was coined way back in the 1970s when computer scientists talking in the first electronic discussion boards noticed that here was "an escalation of critical comments and an increase in the frequency with which people would respond with short negative messages." For anyone that has ventured into the comment section of Youtube, read Twitter for more than a few minutes or frequented active forums will know that our behaviour hasn't improved. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D., a psychologist and professor at MIT, conducted hundreds of interviews over 15 years and found that "we allow ourselves behaviours online we never would in person." These interactions aren't just restricted to strangers on social media as Turkle notes that "we do things online that hurt and damage real relationships". Why is this? Tom Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar project on civic engagement at the Harvard Kennedy School, explains that having the ability to be anonymous "can be a real attraction if no one knows you have a drinking problem or depression. The Internet can be useful in allowing people to anonymously 'come out' about their problems and get support. But it is also an Achilles heel. If people don't know who you are, you are much more likely to say things in a nasty or snarky tone. In general, we invest less in our reputation in online groups because it is easier to exit them and join other groups. In real space, if you don't get along with your neighbour, you're less likely to say something really nasty, because moving out of town is costly." A lot of toxicity is from those who just like hearing themselves talk, or feel better when they put others down. Some people think they are clever and witty by using sarcasm and pointing out the flaws in another's argument. Here's a few ways to manage negativity in your community. Model your ideal behaviour The simplest and most effective way to manage negativity in your community is to be the behaviour you seek. Ensure your replies and friendly and polite. Be fun where appropriate and learn about your regular members. Make sure your team is visible and post regularly so the community feels well run and someone is on hand to deal with issues when they arise. Your community will follow suit and replicate your behaviour. When your community is positive and helpful, toxicity and negativity find it very hard to get a foothold. Your members will weed it out and correct those members for you. Have clear guidelines Socious's Senior Director of Community Management, Katie Bapple advises moderators not to be impulsive when dealing with toxic members. "Controversial community members should not be dealt with compulsively; have reasonable guidelines and policies in place that draw a clear line, so you know when it's been crossed." A clear and well-written community guidelines document won't stop trouble from occurring, but it will provide your team with clear boundaries and protocols to follow. Have a light touch with moderation tools It's easy to reach for the moderation tools when you see toxic or very harmful posts in a topic. It only takes a few clicks, and you can remove it from view and pretend it didn't happen. However, much like a child trying to get his parent's attention, the more you try and silence them, the louder and more insistent they will be to get heard. They'll very likely return more inflamed and vitriolic than before. Unless the content crosses the boundaries you have set for your community; it is often more productive to post a polite reply gently guiding the discussion back on track and thank contributors for their input so far. If this doesn't de-escalate the situation, then: Make it private Open a dialogue with the offender to try and calm the situation. Often this act alone makes the member feel valued and transforms them into a happy and productive member of the community. Just remind them of the boundaries set out in your community guidelines. At least you will stop the member from continuing to post in public areas and derailing topics. Use the appropriate moderation tool Invision Community is packed with tools to help manage toxicity and negativity. However, reaching right for the ban button may not be the best course of action. Consider a warning, which the member must acknowledge before posting again. Keep it friendly and polite and to the point. If the behaviour continues, then consider a short term block. Often an enforced 48 hours away from the community is enough to regain some perspective. Don't assume it'll go away The truth is people love drama, and most people are drawn towards negativity. We can't help but look when we come across a vehicle accident, and sadly, it's largely the same in a community. It might be tempting to keep on scrolling and hope that it all sorts itself out. Likely, it won't, and intervention will be required. That might be a polite, friendly reminder to get the topic back on track, or contacting the member in private. Either way, the best approach is to nip it in the bud with a light touch before it spins out of control, and more forceful action is required. You can't please everyone It should be a last resort, but your community may not be a good fit for everyone. If that is the case, then you can consider a permanent ban, or demoting the member into a read-only member group. Ultimately though negativity and toxicity are pretty rare in an upbeat and productive community. Most quarrels are fixed quickly, and it's rare to find a troll determined to corrupt your community. Identify your boundaries and educate your community on what is not acceptable and be proactive when issues arise, and you'll keep sentiment positive. If you run your own community, I'd love to know what tips you can share on dealing with negativity and toxicity. Let me know below. View the full article
  24. The term "flame-wars" was coined way back in the 1970s when computer scientists talking in the first electronic discussion boards noticed that here was "an escalation of critical comments and an increase in the frequency with which people would respond with short negative messages." For anyone that has ventured into the comment section of Youtube, read Twitter for more than a few minutes or frequented active forums will know that our behaviour hasn't improved. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D., a psychologist and professor at MIT, conducted hundreds of interviews over 15 years and found that "we allow ourselves behaviours online we never would in person." These interactions aren't just restricted to strangers on social media as Turkle notes that "we do things online that hurt and damage real relationships". Why is this? Tom Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar project on civic engagement at the Harvard Kennedy School, explains that having the ability to be anonymous "can be a real attraction if no one knows you have a drinking problem or depression. The Internet can be useful in allowing people to anonymously 'come out' about their problems and get support. But it is also an Achilles heel. If people don't know who you are, you are much more likely to say things in a nasty or snarky tone. In general, we invest less in our reputation in online groups because it is easier to exit them and join other groups. In real space, if you don't get along with your neighbour, you're less likely to say something really nasty, because moving out of town is costly." A lot of toxicity is from those who just like hearing themselves talk, or feel better when they put others down. Some people think they are clever and witty by using sarcasm and pointing out the flaws in another's argument. Here's a few ways to manage negativity in your community. Model your ideal behaviour The simplest and most effective way to manage negativity in your community is to be the behaviour you seek. Ensure your replies and friendly and polite. Be fun where appropriate and learn about your regular members. Make sure your team is visible and post regularly so the community feels well run and someone is on hand to deal with issues when they arise. Your community will follow suit and replicate your behaviour. When your community is positive and helpful, toxicity and negativity find it very hard to get a foothold. Your members will weed it out and correct those members for you. Have clear guidelines Socious's Senior Director of Community Management, Katie Bapple advises moderators not to be impulsive when dealing with toxic members. "Controversial community members should not be dealt with compulsively; have reasonable guidelines and policies in place that draw a clear line, so you know when it's been crossed." A clear and well-written community guidelines document won't stop trouble from occurring, but it will provide your team with clear boundaries and protocols to follow. Have a light touch with moderation tools It's easy to reach for the moderation tools when you see toxic or very harmful posts in a topic. It only takes a few clicks, and you can remove it from view and pretend it didn't happen. However, much like a child trying to get his parent's attention, the more you try and silence them, the louder and more insistent they will be to get heard. They'll very likely return more inflamed and vitriolic than before. Unless the content crosses the boundaries you have set for your community; it is often more productive to post a polite reply gently guiding the discussion back on track and thank contributors for their input so far. If this doesn't de-escalate the situation, then: Make it private Open a dialogue with the offender to try and calm the situation. Often this act alone makes the member feel valued and transforms them into a happy and productive member of the community. Just remind them of the boundaries set out in your community guidelines. At least you will stop the member from continuing to post in public areas and derailing topics. Use the appropriate moderation tool Invision Community is packed with tools to help manage toxicity and negativity. However, reaching right for the ban button may not be the best course of action. Consider a warning, which the member must acknowledge before posting again. Keep it friendly and polite and to the point. If the behaviour continues, then consider a short term block. Often an enforced 48 hours away from the community is enough to regain some perspective. Don't assume it'll go away The truth is people love drama, and most people are drawn towards negativity. We can't help but look when we come across a vehicle accident, and sadly, it's largely the same in a community. It might be tempting to keep on scrolling and hope that it all sorts itself out. Likely, it won't, and intervention will be required. That might be a polite, friendly reminder to get the topic back on track, or contacting the member in private. Either way, the best approach is to nip it in the bud with a light touch before it spins out of control, and more forceful action is required. You can't please everyone It should be a last resort, but your community may not be a good fit for everyone. If that is the case, then you can consider a permanent ban, or demoting the member into a read-only member group. Ultimately though negativity and toxicity are pretty rare in an upbeat and productive community. Most quarrels are fixed quickly, and it's rare to find a troll determined to corrupt your community. Identify your boundaries and educate your community on what is not acceptable and be proactive when issues arise, and you'll keep sentiment positive. If you run your own community, I'd love to know what tips you can share on dealing with negativity and toxicity. Let me know below. View the full article
  25. The term "flame-wars" was coined way back in the 1970s when computer scientists talking in the first electronic discussion boards noticed that here was "an escalation of critical comments and an increase in the frequency with which people would respond with short negative messages." For anyone that has ventured into the comment section of Youtube, read Twitter for more than a few minutes or frequented active forums will know that our behaviour hasn't improved. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D., a psychologist and professor at MIT, conducted hundreds of interviews over 15 years and found that "we allow ourselves behaviours online we never would in person." These interactions aren't just restricted to strangers on social media as Turkle notes that "we do things online that hurt and damage real relationships". Why is this? Tom Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar project on civic engagement at the Harvard Kennedy School, explains that having the ability to be anonymous "can be a real attraction if no one knows you have a drinking problem or depression. The Internet can be useful in allowing people to anonymously 'come out' about their problems and get support. But it is also an Achilles heel. If people don't know who you are, you are much more likely to say things in a nasty or snarky tone. In general, we invest less in our reputation in online groups because it is easier to exit them and join other groups. In real space, if you don't get along with your neighbour, you're less likely to say something really nasty, because moving out of town is costly." A lot of toxicity is from those who just like hearing themselves talk, or feel better when they put others down. Some people think they are clever and witty by using sarcasm and pointing out the flaws in another's argument. Here's a few ways to manage negativity in your community. Model your ideal behaviour The simplest and most effective way to manage negativity in your community is to be the behaviour you seek. Ensure your replies and friendly and polite. Be fun where appropriate and learn about your regular members. Make sure your team is visible and post regularly so the community feels well run and someone is on hand to deal with issues when they arise. Your community will follow suit and replicate your behaviour. When your community is positive and helpful, toxicity and negativity find it very hard to get a foothold. Your members will weed it out and correct those members for you. Have clear guidelines Socious's Senior Director of Community Management, Katie Bapple advises moderators not to be impulsive when dealing with toxic members. "Controversial community members should not be dealt with compulsively; have reasonable guidelines and policies in place that draw a clear line, so you know when it's been crossed." A clear and well-written community guidelines document won't stop trouble from occurring, but it will provide your team with clear boundaries and protocols to follow. Have a light touch with moderation tools It's easy to reach for the moderation tools when you see toxic or very harmful posts in a topic. It only takes a few clicks, and you can remove it from view and pretend it didn't happen. However, much like a child trying to get his parent's attention, the more you try and silence them, the louder and more insistent they will be to get heard. They'll very likely return more inflamed and vitriolic than before. Unless the content crosses the boundaries you have set for your community; it is often more productive to post a polite reply gently guiding the discussion back on track and thank contributors for their input so far. If this doesn't de-escalate the situation, then: Make it private Open a dialogue with the offender to try and calm the situation. Often this act alone makes the member feel valued and transforms them into a happy and productive member of the community. Just remind them of the boundaries set out in your community guidelines. At least you will stop the member from continuing to post in public areas and derailing topics. Use the appropriate moderation tool Invision Community is packed with tools to help manage toxicity and negativity. However, reaching right for the ban button may not be the best course of action. Consider a warning, which the member must acknowledge before posting again. Keep it friendly and polite and to the point. If the behaviour continues, then consider a short term block. Often an enforced 48 hours away from the community is enough to regain some perspective. Don't assume it'll go away The truth is people love drama, and most people are drawn towards negativity. We can't help but look when we come across a vehicle accident, and sadly, it's largely the same in a community. It might be tempting to keep on scrolling and hope that it all sorts itself out. Likely, it won't, and intervention will be required. That might be a polite, friendly reminder to get the topic back on track, or contacting the member in private. Either way, the best approach is to nip it in the bud with a light touch before it spins out of control, and more forceful action is required. You can't please everyone It should be a last resort, but your community may not be a good fit for everyone. If that is the case, then you can consider a permanent ban, or demoting the member into a read-only member group. Ultimately though negativity and toxicity are pretty rare in an upbeat and productive community. Most quarrels are fixed quickly, and it's rare to find a troll determined to corrupt your community. Identify your boundaries and educate your community on what is not acceptable and be proactive when issues arise, and you'll keep sentiment positive. If you run your own community, I'd love to know what tips you can share on dealing with negativity and toxicity. Let me know below. View the full article
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